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Handling & Transporting Artwork

Most Plein Air painters use wet panel carriers because they are literally transporting artwork wet from the field. I recommend transporting artwork to my studio in a wet panel carrier. It protects them from damage in your car (sudden stop) and keeps them clean. Also, be sure to clean out your cases from time to time with compressed air or simply washing them with water and placing them upside down to dry.

If you don’t have a wet panel carrier, placing artwork in a box with cloth or wax paper between pieces also works, but be careful if your artwork has thick impasto. Consider even an inexpensive cardboard carrier.

For transporting and handling large artwork, consider making a DIY Custom Artwork Carrier, here are the instructions.

Protect your Artwork from Dust

Dust on a painting, especially a freshly-varnished one, flares up when I photograph it. Frequently I carefully remove dust from dry paintings before I shoot them with a very low pressure air cleaner (the same kind photographers use to clean lenses). I strive to make the images of your art as perfect as possible. I know that you as an artist see the paint, but please be mindful of what happens to your art after you complete it. Varnish it in a clean setting. Keep your art carriers clean to help me to accurately reproduce your artwork.

How Rossow Photography Handles Artwork

I frequently handle wet or freshly-varnished paintings, many of my clients bring them to me to shoot them before a show or shipping them to galleries. Please let me know if your painting is still wet, recently varnished or has thick impasto. I keep my studio clean and carefully handle your art while photographing it. If I know in advance, I will handle them from the sides and return them to their cases after shooting. If a painting is wet and by rare chance I get paint on my hands from even the side of the canvas I will let you know so you can touch it up if need be.

Recent Painting Photos

Steve Levin painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Gin and Tonic

Gin and Tonic

by Steven J. Levin
Mary Pettis painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Peaceful Afternoon 14x20

Peaceful Afternoon

by Mary Pettis
Paul Oxborough painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Berber Tea 30x40

Berber Tea

by Paul Oxborough
Kelly Schamberger painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Once Upon a Childhood

Once Upon a Childhood

by Kelly Schamberger
Sharon Stadther painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Morning Has Broken

Morning Has Broken

by Sharon Stadther
Pat Duncan painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Red Barn in Summer

Red Barn

by Patricia Duncan
Andrew Sjodin painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Large Dish 42x42

Large Dish

by Andrew Sjodin
Louise Gillis painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Bee Keepers

Bee Keepers

by Louise Gillis
Dan Olson painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Into Fall

Into Fall

by Dan Olson
Megan Johnson painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Scarlet the Sea turtle

Scarlet the Sea Turtle

by Reflections by Megan
Edward Bock painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Singing The Blues 14002023b

Singing The Blues

by Edward Bock
Mary Pettis painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Scenic and Wild 20x30

Scenic and Wild

by Mary Pettis
Carl Cedegren painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Spring Lake Bailing Time

Spring Lake Bailing Time

by Carl Cedegren
John Wegner painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Onion Pot in Shadow

Onion Pot in Shadow

by John Wegner
James Vose painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - As Bees to Their Queen, So Stone Fruits to the Pear, Plying, Praising and Parading
Dyan Padgett painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Vase

Promise

by Dyan Padgett
Kevin Komadina painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - The Blue Swallow 24x24

The Blue Swallow

by Kevin Komadina
Jon Burns painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Purple Iris

Purple Iris

by Jon Burns
Steve Levin painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Lilacs

Lilacs

by Steven J. Levin
Doug Berg painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Barnyard Reflections - Doug Berg

Barnyard Reflections

by Doug Berg
Hannah Heyer painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Broken Snow GT

Broken Snow

by Hannah Heyer
Joe Paquet painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Fair Weather 8x12

Fair Weather

by Joe Paquet
Pomona RoseDyan Padgett painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Pomona Rose

Pomona Rose

by Dyan Padgett
Paul Oxborough painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Dry Martini Bar C 54x72

Dry Martini Bar

by Paul Oxborough
Cheryl LeClair-Sommer painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - The Collective in Autumn

The Collective in Autumn

by Cheryl LeClair Sommer
Jon Burns painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Finch

Finch

by Jon Burns
Mary Pettis painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Ice Flows on the St. Croix 16x20

Ice Flows on the St. Croix

by Mary Pettis
Mary McLean painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Yellow Vase

Floral Still Life Sketch

by MaryMcLean
James Vose painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Simple Entreaties

Simple Entreaties

by James Vose
Paul Oxborough painting photographed by Mitch Rossow - Red Snapper 30x40

Red Snapper

by Paul Oxborough

DIY Custom Transporting Artwork Carrier

Here is how to make a simple, inexpensive carrying case for transporting and handling artwork.

Materials you will need.

  • Reflectix Double Reflective Insulation Roll. Available at most home stores like Home Depot and on Amazon. It’s very affordable ranging from $10-$50 depending on size.
  • Wide Gorilla tape or a strong duct tape
  • Straight edge
  • Sharp knife
  • Tape measure
Reflectix Double Reflective Insulation Rolls

Step 1 – Measure & cut Reflectix

The width of the Reflectix should be the long edge of the artwork plus 6 inches.

The height should be twice the height of the short edge plus 12 inches.

DIY Custom Transporting Artwork Carrier 01

Step 2 – Fold the Reflectix

Fold the Reflectix in half so with back end 6-inches longer than the front.

DIY Custom Transporting Artwork Carrier 02a

Step 3 – Tape together

Use the Gorilla or duct tape to tape the pocket together. The tape should be the length of the seam. Put tape on both the inside and outside of the pocket. No sticky-side of the tape should be exposed. You could reenforce the bottom with a layer of tape too.

DIY Custom Transporting Artwork Carrier

Step 4 – Fold the top flap down

The top end of the back side folds forward to seal the artwork inside.

DIY Custom Transporting Artwork Carrier

Step 5 – Sealing the artwork inside

Use a less-sticky tape to seal the carrier. When you tape the carrier closed, fold half an inch of the tape edge over so the tape can be easily pulled up. This makes opening the carrier much easier.

DIY Custom Transporting Artwork Carrier 05a